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In this discussion forum, we'll be reviewing a variety of popular Benchmade knives. These reviews will cover not only statistical data, but actual life use as well. Though I'm a big Benchmade fan, I'll be very direct and candid about each of the knives that I review. Benchmade, as a GREAT company as it is, isn't perfect...and while I'm sure to point out many positive aspects of the knives, you can also count on me to point out any deficiencies that I see and experience. Additional feedback by the members of this group will also provide a valuable broad-base for those interested in Benchmade's product. So join us as we take a hard look at products produced by one of the world's premier knife manufacturers!

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Replies to This Discussion

Hey Chris! Thanks for that very informative tip, I have stayed away from the D2 steel knives for that very reason. In fact my 710 has the M390 Super Steel which has been a good alternative, what do you think?
Mike
Hi Michael,

Benchmade's D2 is good stuff. While it holds an edge for a long time it's very hard and offers a lot of wear resistance. The main trick with it is to not let it go dull. On my 710D2 I strop it more often (horsehide strop and green buffing rouge) than my 154cm or M4 knives.

One tool I've had for a year now is the Edge Pro Apex, and on the D2 it works really well. I use the 1/2" stones (220, 320, and 600) on the edge, my preferred setting at 24 degrees, and the consistent angle really helps to keep the edge accurate.

There's my $.02.

...Joe






MICHAEL MAYFIELD said:
Hey Chris! Thanks for that very informative tip, I have stayed away from the D2 steel knives for that very reason. In fact my 710 has the M390 Super Steel which has been a good alternative, what do you think?
Mike
Hey Joe!!! Your feedback is certainly worth more than $.02 to me, during my military and security careers, true knife care was never a concern and hardly used in a tactical environment. Being out of both arenas for years I have gained a serious interest in handguns and knives, so any/all advice you can share is most welcome. I have attempted to sharpen some older knives using the Smith's Tri-Hone System with fair success, mastering the proper angel control has been the most stressful and time consuming. I have large hands and the tiny plastic angle guide that is supplied is a true pain, is this system appropriate for the novice?
Thanks Mike
Hi Michael,

I went from Arkansas benchstones to the Spyderco Sharpmaker, and just had a tough time getting the angle right, even when using the Sharpie trick to mark the edge of the blade. The Edge Pro costs about $200 for the initial outlay...so you might have to forego that next knife, but with practice it's not only easy to find the angle you want on the machine to get that edge, but the ease of approach and end results are worth the time and money.

You don't want to start out with a Sebbie or a Mayo...to practice get a few cheapo knives and watch the video the system comes with.

With the Sharpmaker I couldn't budge the steel on my 710D2, but with the "EP" I had a good working edge in 20 minutes of very little effort. It just takes practice AND patience to learn, but after that it's a no-brainer.

Cheers,
Joe



MICHAEL MAYFIELD said:
Hey Joe!!! Your feedback is certainly worth more than $.02 to me, during my military and security careers, true knife care was never a concern and hardly used in a tactical environment. Being out of both arenas for years I have gained a serious interest in handguns and knives, so any/all advice you can share is most welcome. I have attempted to sharpen some older knives using the Smith's Tri-Hone System with fair success, mastering the proper angel control has been the most stressful and time consuming. I have large hands and the tiny plastic angle guide that is supplied is a true pain, is this system appropriate for the novice?
Thanks Mike
Hey Joe! Thanks again, my investment in knives certainly outweighs the cost of the right tool to maintain the properly. In addition, a dull knife is useless under any circumstances, and I would never sell or trade a dull knife.
Mike
Hey Joe! I'm glad that you enjoy them. I don't get a lot of feedback on these...so I never quite know if people are enjoying them and getting some good info out the posting. Obviously, it's a fair amount of work to write one of these up...and if there is anything that I can do to make it better...well, I want to know about it!

Joe Karp said:
Hi Chris,

Thanks for all of your excellent reviews of my favorite brand.

And yes, the Gold class Grip is a superb knife.

Cheers,
Joe



Chris Stookey said:
Nothing quite like the Gold Class Griptilian! Beautiful piece of cutlery!



Chris Stookey said:


I've long avoided doing a review of Benchmade's Griptilian knives. Predominantly, I've felt that the Griptilians are so well known that a review of them would not be needed. Since then, I've come to realize that there are people visiting iKC who have not owned or used a Griptilian. So...this review is mostly for those people; I say "mostly" because there are some long-standing iKC members who really enjoy the Griptilian platform...and those folks may also enjoy the review. Without futher adieu....

551 Full-size Griptilian

* Blade Length: 3.45"
* Blade Thickness: 0.115"
* Blade Material: 154CM Stainless Steel
* Blade Hardness: 58-60 HRC
* Blade Style: Modified Drop-Point; Ambidextrous Thumb-Studs
* Weight: 3.25 oz.
* Clip: Black Reversible Tip-up
* Lock Mechanism: AXIS-ASSIST Lock
* Overall Length: 8.07"
* Closed Length: 4.62"
* Sheath Material: Sold Separately
* Class: Blue

556 Mini-Griptilian

* Blade Length: 2.91"
* Blade Thickness: 0.100"
* Blade Material: 154CM Stainless Steel
* Blade Hardness: 58-60HRC
* Blade Style: Modified Drop Point; Ambidextrous Thumb-Studs
* Weight: 2.56 oz.
* Clip: Black Reversible Tip-up
* Lock Mechanism: AXIS-ASSIST Lock
* Overall Length: 6.78"
* Closed Length: 3.87"
* Sheath Material: Sold Separately
* Class: Blue



BLADE: Both knives feature 154CM steel shaped into modified drop point patterns. As has been well proven, 154CM is a high-value steel that holds up to daily usage and resharpens well. To an extent, the "modification" on the drop point shape involves introduction of clip-point elements to the design. This shape is highly effective for most EDC tasks; however, since the blade isn't done with a full-flat grind, it does lack the slicing efficiency of a Dejavoo. The spine of the blade features an exceptionally well executed thumb ramp. This ramp is perfectly jimped and serves to make the knife much more controllable. This is a great feature and helps immensely when the cutting task at hand requires precision. The blade is deployed manually through ambidextrous thumb-studs. The studs are terraced and easy to manipulate.

HANDLE: The handle scale material on both knives is Valox. This strong-yet-light material makes for an effective and durable handle. The scales feature machining on them to facilitate exceptional traction (which is where the name "Griptilian" comes in). As FRN scales go, the Griptilian scales are quite "grippy"; that said, they don't work as well as a nicely-textured G10 or Carbon Fiber. However, the Valox scales are contoured to fit very comfortably in the user's hand. Beneath the scales are full steel liners. These add torsional strength to the knife. Even with these nested liners, both knives are quite light. Both the full size and "mini" Griptilians feature the Axis Lock system. To be certain, this is one of the greatest locking systems ever created. The mechanism is very safe, providing an exceptionally strong lock up, as well as a nice intermediate detent when closing the blade. This allows the user to feel the next "closing point" prior to securing the blade away. Underneath the handle is a strong pivot pin, housed between bronze phosphor bushings (these help to make the blade deploy very smoothly). Last, but not least, the handle on both knives include a lanyard hole.

PRIMARY USE: The larger Griptilian functions very well in handling just about every EDC task a user can encounter. Often, knife experts talk about "hard use" folding knives. Article after article...and posting after posting mention all kinds of knives...EXCEPT the Griptilian. Ironically, I've found that the full-size Griptilian is a very solid "hard use" knife. It slices, it pierces and even chops a bit...all without ending up the worse for wear. In a pinch, the 551 Griptilian could stand it's own ground in a tactical situation. It's that solid of a knife. As for the 556 Mini Griptilian, it is an excellent small EDC knife. In fact, most tasks that the average person encounters every day, can be easily handled by the compact Mini Grip. Being as well made as it's larger sibling, this small knife is about as durable as they come. From opening packages, mail, cutting string, rope, cardboard and even wood...all extremely doable with the 556.

SECOND KIND OF COOL: Given it's existing lifespan, it could be argued that much of the Griptilian's coolness is yesterday's news. However, some things never go out of style. Top quality, effective as a tool...and the incredible Axis Lock...these things are truly timeless. Additionally, Benchmade has made the Griptilian available in a variety of configurations. While 154CM steel is perhaps the most common, there are Griptilian models available in D2, S30V and even M4. While the Modified Drop Point is probably the most common blade shape, Tanto and Sheepsfoot models exist...as does a Limited Edition Ritter version. Also, Benchmade makes several configurations available with different colored handle scales. The models shown in the accompanying photo are Sand-colored, though OD Green, Blue, Yellow, Black and Pink can all be had. For the collector with some extra dollars in their pocket, the Gold Class Grip features Carbon Fiber scales. So...when it comes to Second Kind of Cool, the Grip has a lot to offer...and most of it at prices just about anyone can afford.

OVERALL TAKE: Benchmades's Griptilian knives have a ton to offer just about every user...from the average person to LE and Military. From a first-timer...to an experienced collector, the Grips are worth checking out.
Hi Micheal,

You are certainly welcome. You must have the Knife Works limited edition version? I just ordered one and am really looking forward to getting it. As for M390, the only knife that I have with this...at least as I can remember...is the 755MPR. And that little buddy is too new to have had to sharpen yet. They say that M390 is truly the "super steel"....and I intend to find out!

MICHAEL MAYFIELD said:
Hey Chris! Thanks for that very informative tip, I have stayed away from the D2 steel knives for that very reason. In fact my 710 has the M390 Super Steel which has been a good alternative, what do you think?
Mike
Hey Chris! You are right, I have #125 of 250 I am sure you will enjoy. My only issue is the handle just fits the palm of my hand, no fault of the knife I have big hands (smile)
Stay Sharp

Chris Stookey said:
Hi Micheal,

You are certainly welcome. You must have the Knife Works limited edition version? I just ordered one and am really looking forward to getting it. As for M390, the only knife that I have with this...at least as I can remember...is the 755MPR. And that little buddy is too new to have had to sharpen yet. They say that M390 is truly the "super steel"....and I intend to find out!

MICHAEL MAYFIELD said:
Hey Chris! Thanks for that very informative tip, I have stayed away from the D2 steel knives for that very reason. In fact my 710 has the M390 Super Steel which has been a good alternative, what do you think?
Mike
I think ur reviews are great and u leave nothing out.I know it must take sum time and I appreciate that time u spend to give to future users/owners of the knife.What about a review on the BM Snody JuJu?

Chris Stookey said:
Hey Joe! I'm glad that you enjoy them. I don't get a lot of feedback on these...so I never quite know if people are enjoying them and getting some good info out the posting. Obviously, it's a fair amount of work to write one of these up...and if there is anything that I can do to make it better...well, I want to know about it!

Joe Karp said:
Hi Chris,

Thanks for all of your excellent reviews of my favorite brand.

And yes, the Gold class Grip is a superb knife.

Cheers,
Joe



Chris Stookey said:
Nothing quite like the Gold Class Griptilian! Beautiful piece of cutlery!



Chris Stookey said:


I've long avoided doing a review of Benchmade's Griptilian knives. Predominantly, I've felt that the Griptilians are so well known that a review of them would not be needed. Since then, I've come to realize that there are people visiting iKC who have not owned or used a Griptilian. So...this review is mostly for those people; I say "mostly" because there are some long-standing iKC members who really enjoy the Griptilian platform...and those folks may also enjoy the review. Without futher adieu....

551 Full-size Griptilian

* Blade Length: 3.45"
* Blade Thickness: 0.115"
* Blade Material: 154CM Stainless Steel
* Blade Hardness: 58-60 HRC
* Blade Style: Modified Drop-Point; Ambidextrous Thumb-Studs
* Weight: 3.25 oz.
* Clip: Black Reversible Tip-up
* Lock Mechanism: AXIS-ASSIST Lock
* Overall Length: 8.07"
* Closed Length: 4.62"
* Sheath Material: Sold Separately
* Class: Blue

556 Mini-Griptilian

* Blade Length: 2.91"
* Blade Thickness: 0.100"
* Blade Material: 154CM Stainless Steel
* Blade Hardness: 58-60HRC
* Blade Style: Modified Drop Point; Ambidextrous Thumb-Studs
* Weight: 2.56 oz.
* Clip: Black Reversible Tip-up
* Lock Mechanism: AXIS-ASSIST Lock
* Overall Length: 6.78"
* Closed Length: 3.87"
* Sheath Material: Sold Separately
* Class: Blue



BLADE: Both knives feature 154CM steel shaped into modified drop point patterns. As has been well proven, 154CM is a high-value steel that holds up to daily usage and resharpens well. To an extent, the "modification" on the drop point shape involves introduction of clip-point elements to the design. This shape is highly effective for most EDC tasks; however, since the blade isn't done with a full-flat grind, it does lack the slicing efficiency of a Dejavoo. The spine of the blade features an exceptionally well executed thumb ramp. This ramp is perfectly jimped and serves to make the knife much more controllable. This is a great feature and helps immensely when the cutting task at hand requires precision. The blade is deployed manually through ambidextrous thumb-studs. The studs are terraced and easy to manipulate.

HANDLE: The handle scale material on both knives is Valox. This strong-yet-light material makes for an effective and durable handle. The scales feature machining on them to facilitate exceptional traction (which is where the name "Griptilian" comes in). As FRN scales go, the Griptilian scales are quite "grippy"; that said, they don't work as well as a nicely-textured G10 or Carbon Fiber. However, the Valox scales are contoured to fit very comfortably in the user's hand. Beneath the scales are full steel liners. These add torsional strength to the knife. Even with these nested liners, both knives are quite light. Both the full size and "mini" Griptilians feature the Axis Lock system. To be certain, this is one of the greatest locking systems ever created. The mechanism is very safe, providing an exceptionally strong lock up, as well as a nice intermediate detent when closing the blade. This allows the user to feel the next "closing point" prior to securing the blade away. Underneath the handle is a strong pivot pin, housed between bronze phosphor bushings (these help to make the blade deploy very smoothly). Last, but not least, the handle on both knives include a lanyard hole.

PRIMARY USE: The larger Griptilian functions very well in handling just about every EDC task a user can encounter. Often, knife experts talk about "hard use" folding knives. Article after article...and posting after posting mention all kinds of knives...EXCEPT the Griptilian. Ironically, I've found that the full-size Griptilian is a very solid "hard use" knife. It slices, it pierces and even chops a bit...all without ending up the worse for wear. In a pinch, the 551 Griptilian could stand it's own ground in a tactical situation. It's that solid of a knife. As for the 556 Mini Griptilian, it is an excellent small EDC knife. In fact, most tasks that the average person encounters every day, can be easily handled by the compact Mini Grip. Being as well made as it's larger sibling, this small knife is about as durable as they come. From opening packages, mail, cutting string, rope, cardboard and even wood...all extremely doable with the 556.

SECOND KIND OF COOL: Given it's existing lifespan, it could be argued that much of the Griptilian's coolness is yesterday's news. However, some things never go out of style. Top quality, effective as a tool...and the incredible Axis Lock...these things are truly timeless. Additionally, Benchmade has made the Griptilian available in a variety of configurations. While 154CM steel is perhaps the most common, there are Griptilian models available in D2, S30V and even M4. While the Modified Drop Point is probably the most common blade shape, Tanto and Sheepsfoot models exist...as does a Limited Edition Ritter version. Also, Benchmade makes several configurations available with different colored handle scales. The models shown in the accompanying photo are Sand-colored, though OD Green, Blue, Yellow, Black and Pink can all be had. For the collector with some extra dollars in their pocket, the Gold Class Grip features Carbon Fiber scales. So...when it comes to Second Kind of Cool, the Grip has a lot to offer...and most of it at prices just about anyone can afford.

OVERALL TAKE: Benchmades's Griptilian knives have a ton to offer just about every user...from the average person to LE and Military. From a first-timer...to an experienced collector, the Grips are worth checking out.
Attachments:
Hi Jeremi!

Glad to hear it. If I had the Snody JuJu, I'd happily review it. Unfortunately, it is one of those items that I don't have in my collection. There are a variety of Snody designs that I just haven't been able to get my hands on. Then again, that's the fun of collecting...the pursuit! Be well and thanks for reading these reviews!

Jeremi Lett said:
I think ur reviews are great and u leave nothing out.I know it must take sum time and I appreciate that time u spend to give to future users/owners of the knife.What about a review on the BM Snody JuJu?

Chris Stookey said:
Hey Joe! I'm glad that you enjoy them. I don't get a lot of feedback on these...so I never quite know if people are enjoying them and getting some good info out the posting. Obviously, it's a fair amount of work to write one of these up...and if there is anything that I can do to make it better...well, I want to know about it!

Joe Karp said:
Hi Chris,

Thanks for all of your excellent reviews of my favorite brand.

And yes, the Gold class Grip is a superb knife.

Cheers,
Joe



Chris Stookey said:
Nothing quite like the Gold Class Griptilian! Beautiful piece of cutlery!



Chris Stookey said:


I've long avoided doing a review of Benchmade's Griptilian knives. Predominantly, I've felt that the Griptilians are so well known that a review of them would not be needed. Since then, I've come to realize that there are people visiting iKC who have not owned or used a Griptilian. So...this review is mostly for those people; I say "mostly" because there are some long-standing iKC members who really enjoy the Griptilian platform...and those folks may also enjoy the review. Without futher adieu....

551 Full-size Griptilian

* Blade Length: 3.45"
* Blade Thickness: 0.115"
* Blade Material: 154CM Stainless Steel
* Blade Hardness: 58-60 HRC
* Blade Style: Modified Drop-Point; Ambidextrous Thumb-Studs
* Weight: 3.25 oz.
* Clip: Black Reversible Tip-up
* Lock Mechanism: AXIS-ASSIST Lock
* Overall Length: 8.07"
* Closed Length: 4.62"
* Sheath Material: Sold Separately
* Class: Blue

556 Mini-Griptilian

* Blade Length: 2.91"
* Blade Thickness: 0.100"
* Blade Material: 154CM Stainless Steel
* Blade Hardness: 58-60HRC
* Blade Style: Modified Drop Point; Ambidextrous Thumb-Studs
* Weight: 2.56 oz.
* Clip: Black Reversible Tip-up
* Lock Mechanism: AXIS-ASSIST Lock
* Overall Length: 6.78"
* Closed Length: 3.87"
* Sheath Material: Sold Separately
* Class: Blue



BLADE: Both knives feature 154CM steel shaped into modified drop point patterns. As has been well proven, 154CM is a high-value steel that holds up to daily usage and resharpens well. To an extent, the "modification" on the drop point shape involves introduction of clip-point elements to the design. This shape is highly effective for most EDC tasks; however, since the blade isn't done with a full-flat grind, it does lack the slicing efficiency of a Dejavoo. The spine of the blade features an exceptionally well executed thumb ramp. This ramp is perfectly jimped and serves to make the knife much more controllable. This is a great feature and helps immensely when the cutting task at hand requires precision. The blade is deployed manually through ambidextrous thumb-studs. The studs are terraced and easy to manipulate.

HANDLE: The handle scale material on both knives is Valox. This strong-yet-light material makes for an effective and durable handle. The scales feature machining on them to facilitate exceptional traction (which is where the name "Griptilian" comes in). As FRN scales go, the Griptilian scales are quite "grippy"; that said, they don't work as well as a nicely-textured G10 or Carbon Fiber. However, the Valox scales are contoured to fit very comfortably in the user's hand. Beneath the scales are full steel liners. These add torsional strength to the knife. Even with these nested liners, both knives are quite light. Both the full size and "mini" Griptilians feature the Axis Lock system. To be certain, this is one of the greatest locking systems ever created. The mechanism is very safe, providing an exceptionally strong lock up, as well as a nice intermediate detent when closing the blade. This allows the user to feel the next "closing point" prior to securing the blade away. Underneath the handle is a strong pivot pin, housed between bronze phosphor bushings (these help to make the blade deploy very smoothly). Last, but not least, the handle on both knives include a lanyard hole.

PRIMARY USE: The larger Griptilian functions very well in handling just about every EDC task a user can encounter. Often, knife experts talk about "hard use" folding knives. Article after article...and posting after posting mention all kinds of knives...EXCEPT the Griptilian. Ironically, I've found that the full-size Griptilian is a very solid "hard use" knife. It slices, it pierces and even chops a bit...all without ending up the worse for wear. In a pinch, the 551 Griptilian could stand it's own ground in a tactical situation. It's that solid of a knife. As for the 556 Mini Griptilian, it is an excellent small EDC knife. In fact, most tasks that the average person encounters every day, can be easily handled by the compact Mini Grip. Being as well made as it's larger sibling, this small knife is about as durable as they come. From opening packages, mail, cutting string, rope, cardboard and even wood...all extremely doable with the 556.

SECOND KIND OF COOL: Given it's existing lifespan, it could be argued that much of the Griptilian's coolness is yesterday's news. However, some things never go out of style. Top quality, effective as a tool...and the incredible Axis Lock...these things are truly timeless. Additionally, Benchmade has made the Griptilian available in a variety of configurations. While 154CM steel is perhaps the most common, there are Griptilian models available in D2, S30V and even M4. While the Modified Drop Point is probably the most common blade shape, Tanto and Sheepsfoot models exist...as does a Limited Edition Ritter version. Also, Benchmade makes several configurations available with different colored handle scales. The models shown in the accompanying photo are Sand-colored, though OD Green, Blue, Yellow, Black and Pink can all be had. For the collector with some extra dollars in their pocket, the Gold Class Grip features Carbon Fiber scales. So...when it comes to Second Kind of Cool, the Grip has a lot to offer...and most of it at prices just about anyone can afford.

OVERALL TAKE: Benchmades's Griptilian knives have a ton to offer just about every user...from the average person to LE and Military. From a first-timer...to an experienced collector, the Grips are worth checking out.

First, let me apologize to all of you Benchmade Addicts. What for? Well, I haven't been posting to the Group for the past couple of months. First, the holidays chewed up an unusually large amount of my time... and second, my computer went down. Those of you who have had your machine crash know this experience. Getting things back up and running with my hectic schedule has been a serious chore. In any event, "I'm BACK!" So... let's get on to today's knife review.

 

The knife that we'll be looking at today, was actually released last year. I promised a review on it some time ago.. but with so many others in front of it, I had to find enough time to spend with this blade in order to really "know it well". It is a Blue Class blade... and can probably be best categorized as being one of the "upper end" of it's category. Without further adieu, I bring you... the SUBROSA....



790 Subrosa: a Lerch design

* Blade Length: 3.76"
* Blade Thickness: 0.125"
* Blade Material: S30V Premium Stainless Steel
* Blade Hardness: 58-60HRC
* Blade Style: Clip-Point; Ambidextrous Thumb-Studs
* Weight: 3.8 oz.
* Clip: Tip-down, Titanium
* Lock Mechanism: Nitrous Assist Mono Lock
* Overall Length: 8.40"
* Closed Length: 4.64"
* Sheath Material: Sold Separately
* Class: Blue


BLADE:  The Benchmade/Lerch designed Subrosa sports an ideally-sized clip point blade. With a length of 3.76", this knife provides it's owner with a lot of capability... as it is neither too large, nor too small. At .125" thick, the blade has just enough mass to give it the additional strength needed to tackle more demanding chores... and yet it isn't so thick as to cause poor performance on simple tasks (like peeling an apple). Benchmade wisely decided to use S30V steel on this knife. The size of the blade is such that it will be used on some tasks that can be pretty hard on lesser steels. The finish on the blade is a well-executed "satin". This was a good choice on the part of Benchmade/Lerch since it wears particularly well. The Subrosa has a 1/3 grind with a nicely formed front-spine swedge. Overall, the blade is shaped in a fashion that makes it very pleasing to look at... and very practical in terms of functionality. The grind lines are cleanly done and the profiles stand out (visually) without making the knife too bold. 

 

The blade is deployed via ideally-located thumb-studs and Benchmade's Nitrous-Assist system. Push the blade out to approximately 35-degrees and the Nitrous system helps complete the opening of the knife. This brings me to the first "knock" that I'll give the knife; it's thumb-studs. The studs are terraced... which may sound good... but Benchmade used the same "volcano" style for the Subrosa that they use on the Torrent. While that tapered design is more "comfortable" for the relatively soft flesh of the thumb, it doesn't provide as sure of traction as some of their other designs do. With the Nitrous-assist system, this small deficiency isn't that big of a "knock". Like the aforementioned Torrent, the Nitrous-assist easily overcomes what would otherwise be a more significant detraction. Speaking of "knocks" and "detractions", this is a good point in the review to mention that the spine of the blade does not have any jimping. Normally, this would diminish the controllability of the knife... however, the design of the handle makes this a "non-issue".


HANDLE: The handle material used on the Subrosa is Titanium. Universally recognized as a higher-end material (at least when it comes to knives), this choice serves the knife well, providing strength, durability and aesthetic appeal while also reducing the overall weight of the knife. This, combined with the blade's S30V steel, certainly indicate Benchmade's desire to target this knife towards more seriously-minded knife users/collectors.

 

The knife has closed length of 4.64". This, combined with the relatively slim profile of the handle, provide the user with a lot of "comfort" and control. Also, in spite of being a little "longer", the handle design makes the knife surprisingly unobtrusive. The handle features some grooves (not as sharp as jimping) at various points of the profile. This works to help the human hand gain "gription". One of those "grooved" areas is located at the point where the spine of the blade meets the handle (when the knife is in the "open" position). This area functions as a "thumb ramp" and benefits from the overall length of the handle being reasonably-sized. I found the thumb-ramp area worked surprisingly well... providing positive control over the tip of the blade. The face areas of the handle feature aesthetically-pleasing patterns and satin steel (looking) dots. The knife also has a Titanium pocket clip that has enough length to help ensure that the Subrosa and it's owner don't become separated. 

Benchmade equipped the Subrosa with their Mono Lock system. In simple terms, this is Benchmade's version of the "frame lock" that most of us are very familiar with. There isn't a lot of difference between the Mono Lock and "most" frame locks available on the market. Note that I said "most". For the discerning user... one that really gets into the "little things"... I'll tell you that I have noticed a couple of very subtle differences that I think provide subtle improvements over the more traditional frame lock. #1: While the Mono-Lock engages "perfectly" to lock the blade open, you don't have to use quite as much "push" to disengage it. This doesn't mean that the Mono Lock system disengages easily, because it never has for me. Rather, this just means that it it works SMOOTHLY. #2: The Mono Lock's relationship to the blade and it's pivot don't ever allow it to impede opening/closing. With the Mono Lock, those actions work SMOOTHLY. Getting the picture? The Subrosa's action is SMOOTH (albeit not CRK Sebenza smooth).

PRIMARY USE: The Subrosa is sized to perform larger EDC tasks very well. From cutting string, heavy rope, leather, paper, cardboard and cloth... to carving, whittling, and drilling on wood, this knife works like a true champ. Clip point blades are ideally suited to these kinds of tasks and the Subrosa works through them EASILY. The blade's "in-between" size also allows it to handle smaller chores SURPRISINGLY well. Whether digging out a sliver, peeling an apple or opening mail, the Subrosa did all of it well and for a series of cumulative design reasons, feels "smaller" than it really is. The knife's Titanium handle is a lot "grippier" than a lot of people would expect it to be. This is largely due to the overall shape of the handle and it's strategically-placed grooves. 

 

This knife could also be expected to perform reasonably well in a tactical situation. Though the blade isn't "big", it is just long enough... combined with the Subrosa's build level... to give an unwelcome situation a good reason to "go away".

SECOND KIND OF COOL:
 The premium handle and blade materials... the highly-stylized shape and the undeniably cool Nitrous-Assist make the Subrosa an extremely cool... UBER COOL... knife. Yes, this knife deserves a spot within Benchmade's own Hall of Fame. It's that cool. It looks cool and functions even better. I can carry it every day and be impressed each and every time that I handle it. In terms of "assisted opening" knives, this may well be my "favorite". Oh... and while I'm at it, there are a couple of other "cool" aspects to the Subrosa that I must mention; A) The name is just fun to say and... B) like most of my Benchmade's, the Subrosa SMELLS factory GOOD! Yeah... I know, I know. That last one was "weird". You HAVE to be a Benchmade Addict to know what I mean.

 

The size of the Subrosa, as well as it's Titanium handle and S30V blade are sure to draw comparisons to the Chris Reeve Large Sebenza 21. Relative to the Sebenza, it could be argued that the Subrosa is a better "competitor" than the Alias I (from Bradley Cutlery).  At half the price of a plain Sebenza... and roughly 90% the price of the Alias I... you really get more "bang for your buck" with the Subrosa. I doubt that any honest reviewer could arrive at a different conclusion. I say this because I have all three knives and have A-B'd them enough to feel that way. Certainly, the Alias I is "uber cool" and I love owning one (it really is a Benchmade "in disguise" anyway!). And what I'm about to say next, I say simply because I must; neither the Alias I nor the Subrosa is a match for the CRK Sebenza. I'm a died-in-the-wool Benchmade Addict, but I must say this the way that I see it. Unless you own a Sebenza, you simply can't know the subtleties that support my statement. 

OVERALL TAKE: The Subrosa is one of the very best Benchmade knives ever made. Even if it didn't have the Nitrous-Assist system, I'd still say this. In fact, if Benchmade came out with a 100% manual version of this knife, I'd buy it before you could say, "Subrosa!" It is a little expensive as Blue Class blades go, but worth every little penny.

That is nice.I have never seen this knife but it is one of the sleekest BM folders I've seen.Thx 4 reviewing.

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